Tag Archives: Credit Union Difference

Teach Your Child to Save During Youth Savings Month

April is National Credit Union Youth Month, and it’s a great time for credit unions, like USAgencies, to focus on children in communities, and talk about some of the ways you can help set your child up for a financially successful future.

Here are some age appropriate suggestions for teaching children money management:

Ages 3 to 6 Years

Before children can handle money, they must first understand simple numbers. and know a penny from a nickel and a dime. Introduce coins by letting them handle money when buying small items.

At 5 or 6, give your child a dime and explain it will buy a piece of candy, or a toy, but not both. Money management involves choices and even at this age, when children spend, they need freedom of choice.

Ages 7 to 12 Years

When children begin to earn an allowance, help them use it wisely by putting part of it in a different envelopes or other containers for different purposes. Make sure sure to include one for savings.

Encourage your child to save by showing them some things that cost more than their allowance, and that they will have to save until they have enough.

Ages 13 to 18 Years

Teens experience managing money and making more decisions. Additional money beyond the normal allowance should not be given out generously. If you give them more, they may not learn the importance of planning, wise spending, and setting limits.

Share with your teenager the responsibility for spending part of the family’s budget. Have them prepare meals or do the weekly shopping; take them with you so they can learn how. Family budgeting will teach your teenager about living costs and values.


Ready to start a savings account for your child, or have some questions? We would love to help. USAgencies Credit Union offers many beneficial youth savings options. Give us a call at 503.275.0300 Option 2, or email at info@usacu.org.

 

I won $500 with Save to Win!

Congrats to USAgencies’ biggest Save to Win prizewinner yet–Jesse! Jesse took home $500 in a quarterly multi-state drawing this January.

Jesse’s very excited about his win and said this was a “nice surprise” and was thrilled with the “good news.” He mentioned he hadn’t won at the Credit Union level yet but that he hopes to win again soon… maybe with “a couple more zeros added onto that check” next time around.

Save to Win was developed by Commonwealth, the Filene Research Institute and the Michigan Credit Union League (MCUL). The MCUL launched the pilot program in partnership with eight Michigan credit unions in 2009 and has since expanded to include several states. The program is now administered by CU Solutions Group, an affiliate of MCUL.

To date, the program has awarded more than $2.3 million dollars in cash prizes and has helped credit union members save nearly $140 million nationwide.


 

To learn more about Save to Win at USAgencies Credit Union, visit https://www.usacu.org/savetowin.

ENGLISH insurance label

Tax Identity Theft Awareness Week

From our friends at the Federal Trade Commission

Tax identity theft happens when someone uses your Social Security number to get a tax refund or a job. You might find out it has happened when you get a letter from the IRS saying more than one tax return was filed in your name, or IRS records show you have wages from an employer you don’t know.

Learn how to reduce the chance you’ll be a victim and find out what to do if you are during Tax Identity Theft Awareness Week, January 29-February 2, 2018. The FTC and its partners are hosting a series of free webinars and Twitter chats. Follow the links below for information about how to participate.

Here’s what’s on tap:

Monday, Jan. 29

  • 2 p.m. EST ― The FTC and the Identity Theft Resource Center co-host a webinar for consumers. Learn about tax-related identity theft and IRS imposter scams, their financial and emotional impact, how to protect yourself, and how to recover if you become a victim.

Tuesday, Jan. 30

  • 2:30 p.m. EST ― The FTC, AARP Fraud Watch Network, AARP Foundation Tax-Aide program, and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration host a webinar on tax identity theft and IRS imposter scams. Learn how tax identity theft and IRS imposter scams occur, how to avoid them, recovery steps for victims, and about free resources for you and your community.

Wednesday, Jan. 31

  • 11 a.m. EST ― The FTC and the Department of Veterans Affairs co-host a Twitter chat for service members, veterans, and their families. Learn how to minimize your risk of tax identity theft, and what to do if it happens to you. Join the conversation at #VeteranIDTheft.
  • 1 p.m. EST ― The FTC, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration discuss tax identity theft, IRS imposter scams, and how to lower your risk of becoming a victim. This is a closed webinar for Veterans Administration employees, contractors, and patients.

Thursday, Feb. 1

  • 1 p.m. EST ― The FTC and IRS offer a webinar for small businesses: Protecting Sensitive Business and Customer Data ― Practical Identity Safety Practices for Your Business. Learn about tax-related identity theft, imposter scams that target businesses, practical cybersecurity practices for small business, data breach response, and free resources for your business, employees and customers.
  • 3 p.m. EST ― The FTC and the Identity Theft Resource Center co-host a Twitter chat about protecting yourself against tax-related identity theft. Get to know the warning signs, how to reduce the chance of becoming a victim, and how to recover if it happens to you. Join the conversation at #IDTheftChat.

 

For information about identity theft in general, please visit ftc.gov/idtheft.

Take Control of Your Money in 2018

A Credit Union Can Help You Become Financially Fit

Joining a gym, finally taking your dream vacation, or planning to spend more time with the family this year?  Why not make financial fitness one of your New Year’s Resolutions, too?  It’s do-able, and the first thing on your list should be to join a credit union.

Because credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, you’re a member—and an owner. Unlike for-profit financial institutions that must pay stockholders, credit unions return benefits back to you, the member. That means you pay lower fees, and get lower interest rates on your loans and credit cards.

Nearly two million Oregonians are member-owners of credit unions. Here’s how that helped their financial fitness last year: *

  • Collectively, their Beaver State credit unions delivered $180.5 million in direct benefits right back to them.
  • That’s an advantage of $107 that each member enjoyed because they banked with a credit union.
  • Every Main Street household with a credit union member, saw benefits of at least $203.
  • Consumers who got their new car loans from an Oregon credit union, are saving an average of $251 in interest during each year of a 60-month, $25,000 loan.
  • The interest rate that Oregon credit unions charge for credit cards, is as much as 5.4 percent lower than rates that profit-driven financial institutions are charging. That means Oregon’s credit union members spent $29 million less of their hard-earned money on credit card interest rates, than bank customers spent.
  • Credit unions cooperate. Most network their ATMS, meaning members have access to their money as they travel. They can use the ATM at almost any credit union, and they don’t have to pay those annoying fees!

*Source: Informa Research comparing not-for-profit and profit-driven financial institutions’ interest rates and fees in the 12 months ending June 30, 2017; National Credit Union Administration and Credit Union National Association.


Still not a member of USAgencies Credit Union? Join today!

Already a member, but know someone who could benefit from membership? Refer them to USAgencies and you’ll both be eligible for our Refer-a-Member drawing. 

USACU at the 2017 GAC

At the GAC‘Powerful Cause and Positive Effect’ was the theme for this year’s Credit Union National Association (CUNA) Governmental Affairs Conference (GAC). USAgencies very own Kathy Scholes, Vice President/CFO; Kasey Rockwell, Director of CU Relations; and Jeff Griese, Board of Directors 1st Vice-Chair, all attended the conference late February in our nation’s capital, along with over 5,000 credit union professionals and advocates from around the U.S.

Every year credit union proponents descend upon Washington D.C. to connect with peers, glean best practices, trade stories, and gain insights of the political landscape for credit unions and the financial industry. Attendees had the opportunity to hear from great speakers such as the Honorable Colin L. Powell; Kat Cole, Group President of Focus Brands; CUNA President, Jim Nussle; and a lineup of Congressional lawmakers and regulators from the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).

Scholes, Rockwell and Griese met with Oregon credit union peers to ensure the message was consistent for lawmakers before they climbed the steps of Capitol Hill. They met with Congressman Blumenauer’s (D-OR-3) Deputy Chief of Staff and Counsel, David Skillman. There were about 30 constituents in the meeting, representing nine credit unions from the Portland area. Later in the afternoon Oregon credit unions also met with Senator Ron Wyden and staff from Senator Merkley’s office to share the same message. Some of the information shared with legislators included:

  • Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives and are inherently accountable to their members, not to Wall Street stockholders.
  • Members own their cooperative credit unions. This means financial dividends, lower interest rates on loans and higher interest rates on savings are delivered to member-owners as direct benefits.
  • The Northwest Credit Union Association recently commissioned economists at ECONorthwest to perform their second independent analysis on credit unions’ impact in our Northwest economy. They found that Oregon credit unions delivered $159 million in direct financial benefit to their 2 million member-owners. That’s $81 per credit union member and $156 financial benefit per member household, delivered through lower fees and better rates as a result of that cooperative structure.
  • The importance of Common-Sense Regulatory Reform and how one-size-fits-all regulations don’t work for small credit unions.
  • The costs of merchant data breaches and how costs should ultimately be borne by the entity that occurs the breach.

They ended the day with a reception on the Hill with credit unions from Oregon, Washington and Idaho. It was a long, but productive day!

Rockwell summed up her experience at this year’s GAC, “Sharing our credit union stories with elected officials is a great honor. Being in D.C. allows you to feel like you are a part of something bigger than your credit union. You can feel the energy of all of us working together to make a difference. Twenty years ago, was my first GAC and I still have the same excitement and feeling of honor to be a part of the Credit Union Movement. We are doing great things to help improve our member’s financial lives and are staying true to the foundational credit union philosophy of ‘People Helping People’.”

Griese left feeling inspired, saying “My testimony of the credit union movement has grown tremendously and seeing so many hard-working folks gathered together in an effort to improve people’s lives was inspiring and something I will not soon forget!”

Scholes shared her thoughts, saying “Attending the 2017 CUNA Governmental Affairs Conference was an amazing experience! Being one of 5,000 credit union professionals converging on the Capital to meet with elected officials to tell our story and fight for credit union interests was moving. I returned to Portland with a renewed interest to advocate for the credit union movement. Credit unions are good for consumers, our member-owners. We need to work to protect our unique structure and improve awareness to our members and potential members of who and what we are that makes us different from other financial service providers. ‘People Helping People’ by looking out for the financial well-being of our members and communities – what’s not to love!”

Letter from the CEO: It’s Different Here

If you haven’t already noticed, things are a little bit different here at USAgencies Credit Union… in a good way.

What do I mean, exactly? Well, first-off, we’re a credit union, which means we are a financial cooperative, created by, and for, our members. At a credit union, you’re part owner… Can you say that about your bank?

Secondly, we have several things that we just flat-out won’t do because they’re not in our members’ best interests. We won’t offer products and services that don’t uphold our standards, just to make a buck or two. We won’t put you in a product or service that’s not good for you and your financial future. And we won’t charge excessive fees, just to help our bottom line. Our members are our bottom line.

There are so many other ways we’re different – these are just a few examples. We hope that you appreciate this difference. If you do, why not pay it forward and share us with friends and family by telling them about USAgencies Credit Union?

Jim Lumpkin, President/CEO, USACU
Jim Lumpkin
President/CEO
USAgencies Credit Union